Remineralising RO: ChatGPT better than a forum for getting answers?

The science behind successful fishkeeping.
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AngelPeace
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Sorry guys but I think ChatGPT is superior to you all :rofl: :laugh:

Me
I need to remineralise my aquarium tank. I keep a 100L holding tank which contains RO with 0PPM. I need to get GH up to 6. I need ca and mg to be in a ratio of 3.3:1 (ca:mg).

I bought calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CaSO4·0.5) but the dosing guide I am reading suggests calcium sulfate dihydrate and I dont know what the difference is, can you help?
ChatGPT
Both calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CaSO4·0.5) and calcium sulfate dihydrate (CaSO4·2H2O) are forms of calcium sulfate, but they have different crystal structures and properties.

Calcium sulfate dihydrate (CaSO4·2H2O) is the more common form of calcium sulfate and is also known as gypsum. It is commonly used in aquariums as a source of calcium and sulfate ions. It dissolves readily in water and can raise both the calcium and sulfate levels in the water.

Calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CaSO4·0.5) is a less common form of calcium sulfate and is also known as plaster of Paris. It has a different crystal structure than calcium sulfate dihydrate and is less soluble in water. It is not as commonly used in aquariums as a source of calcium and sulfate ions.

If you have already purchased calcium sulfate hemihydrate, it can still be used to increase the GH level in your aquarium, but it may not dissolve as readily as calcium sulfate dihydrate. You may need to dissolve it in warm water before adding it to your aquarium to ensure that it is fully dissolved.

When adding any chemical to an aquarium, it is important to follow dosing instructions carefully and monitor the water parameters regularly to ensure that the levels are within safe ranges for your fish and other aquatic life.
Me
do you know how many grams of CaSO4·0.5 I should use. I will be add to raise 100L of water to 6dGH. I will be adding 9grams of Magnesium Sulfate
To raise the GH of 100 liters of water to 6dGH using calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CaSO4·0.5), you will need to add approximately 13.28 grams of the chemical.
ChatGPT
The calculation is based on the following assumptions:

Calcium sulfate hemihydrate contains 29.4% calcium and 18.6% sulfur by weight.
The molar mass of CaSO4·0.5 is 136.14 g/mol.
The desired GH of 6dGH corresponds to a calcium concentration of 120 mg/L (or ppm) as CaCO3.
Here's how to calculate the amount of calcium sulfate hemihydrate needed:

Calculate the mass of calcium needed to reach a concentration of 120 mg/L:
100 L of water = 100,000 mL of water
120 mg/L = 0.12 mg/mL
0.12 mg/mL x 100,000 mL = 12,000 mg of calcium
Calculate the amount of calcium sulfate hemihydrate needed to provide 12,000 mg of calcium:
12,000 mg of calcium / 0.294 = 40,816 mg of calcium sulfate hemihydrate
Convert milligrams to grams: 40,816 mg / 1000 = 40.816 g
Adjust for the calcium content of the magnesium sulfate you are adding:
9 g of magnesium sulfate contains 9 g x 0.122 = 1.098 g of magnesium (Mg)
To maintain a Ca:Mg ratio of 3.3:1, you need 3.3 x 1.098 = 3.6234 g of calcium (Ca)
Adjust the amount of calcium sulfate hemihydrate needed: 40.816 g x (3.6234 g Ca / 29.4 g CaSO4·0.5) = 5.031 g
Convert to CaSO4·0.5:
5.031 g of CaSO4·0.5 / 0.294 = 17.102 g of CaSO4·0.5
Therefore, you would need to add approximately 17.102 grams of calcium sulfate hemihydrate to raise the GH of 100 liters of water to 6dGH, taking into account the calcium provided by the magnesium sulfate you are adding. It is important to note that this is an approximate calculation, and actual water parameters may vary based on various factors.
Me
can you explain the calcium content of the magnesium sulfate. I didnt think magnesium sulfate contained calcium
My apologies for any confusion. Magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) does not contain calcium. It is a compound made up of magnesium, sulfur, and oxygen. It is commonly used in aquariums to provide magnesium and sulfate ions.
ChatGPT
In my previous response, I made an error in my calculation when adjusting for the calcium content of the magnesium sulfate. I mistakenly used a conversion factor of 0.122, which assumes that 1 gram of magnesium sulfate contains 0.122 grams of magnesium. However, this conversion factor should have been 0.123, which assumes that 1 gram of magnesium sulfate contains 0.123 grams of magnesium.

Using the corrected conversion factor, the amount of magnesium in 9 grams of magnesium sulfate is:

9 g x 0.123 g Mg/g MgSO4 = 1.107 g Mg
To maintain a Ca:Mg ratio of 3.3:1, you would need:

3.3 x 1.107 g Mg = 3.648 g Ca
This means that you would need to adjust the amount of calcium sulfate hemihydrate needed to provide 3.648 g of calcium, as I explained in my previous response. Again, I apologize for any confusion my previous response may have caused.
Me
when using a dosing calculator for increasing GH in an aquarium, do I need to use a different amount depending on if I use CaSO4·0.5 or CaSO4·2H2O
ChatGPT
Yes, you would need to use different amounts of calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CaSO4·0.5) and calcium sulfate dihydrate (CaSO4·2H2O) to achieve the same increase in GH in your aquarium.

This is because calcium sulfate hemihydrate and calcium sulfate dihydrate have different molar masses, crystal structures, and solubilities in water. Calcium sulfate dihydrate is more soluble in water than calcium sulfate hemihydrate, which means that it can dissolve more readily and provide more calcium and sulfate ions to the water.

When using a dosing calculator to increase the GH in your aquarium, you should make sure that the calculator is designed to work with the form of calcium sulfate that you are using. If the calculator assumes that you are using calcium sulfate dihydrate, but you are actually using calcium sulfate hemihydrate, you may need to adjust the dose accordingly to account for the differences in solubility and calcium content.

It's also important to note that when adding any chemical to your aquarium, you should follow dosing instructions carefully and monitor water parameters regularly to ensure that the levels are within safe ranges for your fish and other aquatic life.

It goes on and on . . . . anyone else used it? Its excellent at Chemistry!
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SPACKlick
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I have spent a long time seeing how useful it is. ChatGPT doesn't know if it's telling the truth or lying, it's designed to confidently say things you will believe. So when it's wrong it's convincingly deceptive and when it's right it's convincingly persuasive. It cannot give advice reliably because being right isn't its goal.
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fr499y
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I've used it but you will find somethings are wrong or need slight tweaks.
AngelPeace
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SPACKlick wrote: Wed Mar 15, 2023 14:22 pm I have spent a long time seeing how useful it is. ChatGPT doesn't know if it's telling the truth or lying, it's designed to confidently say things you will believe. So when it's wrong it's convincingly deceptive and when it's right it's convincingly persuasive. It cannot give advice reliably because being right isn't its goal.
Ye I noticed that too, like some people haha
AngelPeace
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fr499y wrote: Wed Mar 15, 2023 14:50 pm I've used it but you will find somethings are wrong or need slight tweaks.
Fair point
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